EUFORGEN
Print this page

Cedrus atlantica
Atlas cedar

Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica) is an evergreen tree that naturally exists mainly in seven locations on the upper slopes of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco and Algeria.   

In Europe, the tree is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes in parks, roadsides and elsewhere. In the Mediterranean it can be used for afforestation of barren lands. An antiseptic oil, obtained from the tree’s leaves and branches, is known to have many different properties and is used for treating skin diseases, cystitis and bronchitis, for insect-repellent and in perfume. Its timber is strong and durable and valued for joinery, veneer, furniture and constructions in general.

Atlas cedar, usually occurring at elevation of 1300-1600 metres above sea level, is hardy but requires a lot of light. During its growing season, there is little or no rain in areas where the tree naturally exists. The tree gets water from the soil, fed by the melting snow from the mountain peaks.

A combination of human exploitation, pests and decreasing precipitation in the areas where it grows have caused a heavy decline of the natural populations over the last 50 years.   

Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica) is an evergreen tree that naturally exists mainly in seven locations on the upper slopes of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco and Algeria.   

In Europe, the tree is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes in parks, roadsides and elsewhere. In the Mediterranean it can be used for afforestation of barren lands. An antiseptic oil, obtained from the tree’s leaves and branches, is known to have many different properties and is used for treating skin diseases, cystitis and bronchitis, for insect-repellent and in perfume. Its timber is strong and durable and valued for joinery, veneer, furniture and constructions in general.

Atlas cedar, usually occurring at elevation of 1300-1600 metres above sea level, is hardy but requires a lot of light. During its growing season, there is little or no rain in areas where the tree naturally exists. The tree gets water from the soil, fed by the melting snow from the mountain peaks.

A combination of human exploitation, pests and decreasing precipitation in the areas where it grows have caused a heavy decline of the natural populations over the last 50 years.   

Map elements

Web Address of the page:

http://www.euforgen.org/species/cedrus-atlantica/